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WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES

                      "Holodomor Through the Eyes of Ukrainian Artists"

              The exhibition was held in November, 2008 at the Ukrainian House, Kyiv, Ukraine


 
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WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES
        First on the left: Famine 33
                by Victor Zaretsky
           In the center: Gods
           by Mykola Pavlusenko
            Sets of drawings
        by Mykhailo Ivanchenko
WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES
          First on the left:
       Life Became Better

        by Mykola Pavlusenko
        Set of linocuts: Ukraine 33
                 A Cookbook

         by Mykola Bondarenko
            Students' posters
WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES
     A student visiting the exhibition   Artist Vira Kuleba with her painting
            Unforgettable
          Students' posters
WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES
        Artist Valeriy Viter
           with his posters
      Tryptich Children of Holodomor
                by Nina Marchenko
         Life Became Better
           by Nestor Kyzenko
WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES
  Set of paintings For Ear Spikes
          by Vasyl Makatukha
       American-Ukrainian artist
    Eugenia Dallas with her drawings
    Set of paintings Unforgettable
            by Vira Kuleba
WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES
          Before and after....     First on the right: Mother  '33
          by Nina Marchenko
        Tryptich Genocide 33
    by Taras & Yuri Honcharenko
WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES
       Stalin and Ukrainians
     poster by Yevhen Luniov
        First on the left:
        In the Year of 1933

         by Ivan Novobranets
   Artist Mykola Bondarenko
          with his artworks
WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES WE REMEMBER - THE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES
     Artist Petro Malyshko
  with his painting Torn Bind
   Mrs. Kutkin with the graphic
      of her late husband
  Would Like To Name Everybody
  Everything Belongs to the State
           by unknown artist
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________
COPIES OF THE ARTWORKS and OTHER HOLODOMOR EXHIBITION MATERIALS ARE AVAILABLE
Please check FOR SALE gallery: http://www.artukraine.com/index.php?do=cat&category=sale
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

FROM THE GUESTS' BOOK (translated from Ukrainian):

"Opponents still argue whether to recognize Holodomor of the 30s as genocide of Ukrainian people. Some of them say the reason
 was bad harvest in 1932, some do not agree with the number of victims. Some say everything was not so bad and the number of
10 million people who died of hunger is much exaggerated. Some, on the contrary, prove the fact of genocide.

For me this question is clear.

My grandmother, Vera Kol'tsova, was born in 1924 in the village of Stara Mahnovka, near Odesa. It was there, when in the 30s
hunger came into her life. From my childhood I remember how
she, half serious, half joking , made my sister and me eat everything in our plates, telling us about hunger.

Recently, being an adult, I asked her this question: "Did Holodomor really happen?"

That's what she told me:

"In early thirties severe hunger really happened. Food was in short supply the years before, but this one was really awful.
The harvest that year was not rich and actually everybody in the village was afraid that it would not be enough grain for the next
 year sowing. But then they just started taking away all our grain. They said the grain was collected for the next year sowing.
They said people in the cities were starving and we need to save them. We could not check that. They just came and took away
 everything, only a meager part was left to us.

Actually, what saved us was the fact that our village and the neighboring village were considered to be very poor. In fact, there
 were no "kurkuls" in our village, not even "serednyaky" (middle-level peasants). That's why they did not check us thoroughly enough.
 Nobody was beating us, nobody tortured us. But anyway, they were searching for grain. They had those long metal sticks and checked
 floors, hay, etc... Many people tried to hide grain in the underground but it was difficult to hide sacks. Once, an activist was murdered
 with his own metal stick. A peasant could not watch the activist loading his grain on a vagon and attacked him.

I remember how the father put my brother and me on a small, half empty sack. I do not know what was in the sack , probably grain.
He covered the sack with mops and on the mops he put our toys. And while they were searching our house we were sitting on the sack
and playing toys. Father forbade us to leave the sack.

But, of course, it did not save us. The hunger came anyway. We picked up and boiled weeds, cooked black seeds of some grass instead
of porridge. Also, there was a plant with large seeds like beans. We boiled them too.

We were starving. My elder sister worked at the collective farm in the neighboring village, she was doing better than we. She had something
 to eat. And my legs were swollen because of hunger, as well as my belly. It was scaring to look at my legs, they were so ugly. Once, Mom
sent me to my sister at the collective farm to get some food, I do not remember what it was. It was about five kilometers to walk. I walked
there but I could not walk back. Just fell down. I could not even stand up, I could not even cry out. Luckily, my sister's friend saw me. She
called on my sister, they together put me in the vagon and took me home to Mom. I was not able to walk.

My grandmother survived Holodomor and then four years of occupation. After the war she finished school and the University, and became
 a teacher of the Ukrainian language. She worked as a teacher at a technical school for forty years. At present she retired, her students still
ove her and often visit her.

And at nights she still has nightmares about food....".

 





                                              


November 30, 2008

 
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